Category Archives: Global political action

Time out

I’m taking a leave from my blog for a month or so, to pursue other professional and personal duties and pleasures. In the meantime, some of you might be interested in taking a look at some blog entries that I think are worth reading, but that are buried in the nether recesses of this blog, and an earlier version of it.
“Radar Dogs” remind me that all is not (yet) lost
Take a deep breath, St. Clements, and get a whiff of chaotic development Continue reading

Time out, for travel and reflection

I’ll be away from my blog until mid-October, for family time and to meet a couple of professional obligations. I’ll leave you with some posts that you may have missed the first time around.

From Henry Ford to Walmart
Nobody ever accused Henry Ford of having an overdeveloped social conscience. All the more reason to reflect on the chasm between his labour relations philosophy and the one that prevails today.

Does mixed-income housing ameliorate poverty?
A hotly-contested issue that has lost none of its currency. If anyone knows of new findings since I researched this, I’m interested in your comments. In fact, comments are always welcome.

How dangerous are our streets?
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Clean Clothes hits global corporate offenders where it hurts: Their brands

What can we do about global corporations that exploit vulnerable workers? Everyone who follows the news knows that products we buy in wealthy countries are manufactured in countries where poor people hope to sweat their way out of poverty by taking factory jobs. Global corporations invest in the third world for cheap labour and because they will enjoy relative freedom from regulation.

The results are predictable. As I pointed out in a recent blog entry, freedom from regulation inevitably leads to unsafe working conditions and exploitation of workers. Typically, the companies that sell us clothes and other products manufactured in the third world contract the production out to companies you’ve never heard of. Continue reading

The human cost of industrialization

This month, and in September, hundreds of workers were suffocated, burned to death, or leaped to their deaths trying to escape from garment factory fires in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Russia. It is a story that keeps repeating itself, as witness a first-person description of a fire in New York in 1903, which tells of horrors similar to the ones workers experienced in the last couple of months:

…the flames were… blazing fiercely and spreading fast. If we couldn’t get out we would all be roasted alive. The locked door that blocked us was half of wood; the upper half was thick glass. Some girls were screaming, some were beating the door with their fists, some were trying to tear it open. Continue reading

Time out

I’ll be away until late October and, since this blog is devoted to research-based analysis and commentary, I’ll take a break from posting, because there won’t be any time for research. Meanwhile, you might want to catch up on some blog entries from the past that you might have missed.

Why we love cities, even while we tell ourselves we hate them
What has globalization done to democracy? Continue reading

What has globalization done to democracy?

Everyone has opinions about the answer to this question. Those opinions usually take the form of pre-conceived notions, diametrically opposed to each other, and they almost always generate more heat than light – although the tone of the debate is gradually moderating, as globalization critics start to get their act together.

On one side of the well-worn globalization argument, we hear complaints about how global corporations have acquired so much power that governments stand helpless before them, rendering democracy meaningless. On the other, we hear Continue reading

INTRODUCTION TO MY BLOG

I’m a professor of politics at the University of Winnipeg. I’ve spent most of my adult life doing research, writing and teaching, first about African politics and, more recently, city politics. Before becoming a professor, I was a journalist, writing for daily newspapers.
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